“Don’t Play God!”: Is inaction Preference linked to obsessive compulsive characteristics?

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Francesca D'Olimpio, Francesco Mancini: “Don’t Play God!”: Is inaction Preference linked to obsessive compulsive characteristics?. In: Clinical Neuropsychiatry, vol. 13, no 6, pp. 122-129, 2016.

Abstract

Objective: two kinds of guilt feelings have been postulated: altruistic and deontological. the latter seems to
play a role in the genesis and maintenance of obsessive-compulsive Disorder (ocD) and to be linked to inaction
choice in moral dilemmas. This paper aims to investigate whether inaction choices in moral dilemmas are
specifically linked to obsessive-compulsive (OC) characteristics and to deontological guilt.
Methods: In the first study, participants completed questionnaires for depression, anxiety and oc and answered to
moral and non-moral dilemmas. In the second study, after deontological or altruistic guilt or of shame
induction and in control condition (no emotive induction), they answered to moral and non-moral dilemmas and to
Padua Inventory

BibTeX (Download)

@article{D'Olimpio3000,
title = {“Don’t Play God!”: Is inaction Preference linked to obsessive compulsive characteristics?},
author = {Francesca D'Olimpio and Francesco Mancini},
editor = {Giovanni Fioriti Editore},
url = {https://apc.it/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/2016-dont-play-god-3.pdf},
year  = {2016},
date = {2016-12-01},
journal = {Clinical Neuropsychiatry},
volume = {13},
number = {6},
pages = {122-129},
abstract = {Objective: two kinds of guilt feelings have been postulated: altruistic and deontological. the latter seems to
play a role in the genesis and maintenance of obsessive-compulsive Disorder (ocD) and to be linked to inaction
choice in moral dilemmas. This paper aims to investigate whether inaction choices in moral dilemmas are
specifically linked to obsessive-compulsive (OC) characteristics and to deontological guilt.
Methods: In the first study, participants completed questionnaires for depression, anxiety and oc and answered to
moral and non-moral dilemmas. In the second study, after deontological or altruistic guilt or of shame
induction and in control condition (no emotive induction), they answered to moral and non-moral dilemmas and to
Padua Inventory},
keywords = {deontological guilt; altruistic guilt; shame; moral dilemma; obsessive-compulsive characteristics},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {article}
}
//

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