What if metacognition is not enough? Its association with delusion may be moderated by self-criticism

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Simone Cheli, Veronica Cavalletti, Francesco Mancini, Gil Goldzweig: What if metacognition is not enough? Its association with delusion may be moderated by self-criticism. In: Current Psychology, 2021.

Abstract

Metacognition among those reporting psychotic symptoms is associated with a distortion in the way they understand their own
and others’ mental states. Recent advances suggest that distortion in the form of self-criticism may activate a threat response
and fuel symptom expression. At high level of self-criticism metacognition may reduce its protective role towards psychosis.
Here, we explored whether the associations between impaired self-reflectivity and delusional ideation would decrease in
the presence of self-criticism. A moderated regression model confirmed our hypothesis in a large sample of healthy young
adults (N = 2065) even when controlled for sex, education, and family income. Our findings suggest how interventions aimed
at reducing symptoms and promoting metacognition should always be interconnected with those targeting self-criticism.

BibTeX (Download)

@article{Cheli2021,
title = {What if metacognition is not enough? Its association with delusion  may be moderated by self-criticism},
author = {Simone Cheli and Veronica Cavalletti and Francesco Mancini and Gil Goldzweig},
editor = {Springer Link},
url = {https://apc.it/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/2021-mancini-Cheli_et_al-2021-Current_Psychology-1.pdf},
doi = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-021-02451-7},
year  = {2021},
date = {2021-11-05},
journal = {Current Psychology},
abstract = {Metacognition among those reporting psychotic symptoms is associated with a distortion in the way they understand their own 
and others’ mental states. Recent advances suggest that distortion in the form of self-criticism may activate a threat response 
and fuel symptom expression. At high level of self-criticism metacognition may reduce its protective role towards psychosis. 
Here, we explored whether the associations between impaired self-reflectivity and delusional ideation would decrease in 
the presence of self-criticism. A moderated regression model confirmed our hypothesis in a large sample of healthy young 
adults (N = 2065) even when controlled for sex, education, and family income. Our findings suggest how interventions aimed 
at reducing symptoms and promoting metacognition should always be interconnected with those targeting self-criticism.},
keywords = {Compassion Delusional ideation Metacognition Psychosis Self-criticism Self-reflectivity},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {article}
}
//

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